Pascagoula: The Closest Encounter, My Story – A REVIEW

Worst Fishing Experience Ever

     One of the perks for an aging crackpot who spent a considerable number of years exploring the UFO issue is society’s expectation that he’ll be stubbornly set in his odd ways, staunchly dedicated to standing by outlandish opinions, no matter what.

Not quite accurate — but that’s how I feel about the Pascagoula UFO abduction incident, highly impressed and willing to suggest, oh my god, put all the other abduction reports aside and concentrate on whatever may have happened to Charles

Robert Barrow

By Robert Barrow
The UFO Chronicles
8-28-18

Hickson and Calvin Parker in the late afternoon of October 11, 1973 as they anticipated a little quiet time, fishing on the Pascagoula River in Mississippi. Should the story be accurate, the only catch of the day was two fishermen abducted and physically examined by entities that emerged from a craft dropping in from the sky.

In the pages of this blog, several times over the years, we’ve discussed with deep respect the Pascagoula case (check out the search engine on this page), and details of the incident abound on the Internet, so I’m not going to rehash what’s already been rehashed to death.

What IS new is a missing piece to the Pascagoula puzzle in the form of an unexpected but very welcome book written by Calvin Parker himself. Entitled, Pascagoula: The Closest Encounter, My Story, is a book that needed to be written, particularly because while Charlie Hickson was alive he wrote of the incident himself and gave multiple interviews, while Calvin Parker ran from publicity and spent years trying to get things right in his head after experiencing something incredible. Something overpowering and frightening, orchestrated by creatures appearing nothing whatsoever like the traditional variety plastered upon many a book and movie screen. Indeed, these entities reportedly appeared truly “alien.”

No, I have not seen the book yet. Maybe I never will, as I gave up reading and reviewing UFO-related books for print a long time ago, having realized that my meager contributions to UFO research had peaked and it was time to get out of the way. Still, I am intrigued, and I may latch on to a copy sooner or later.

Why am I a Pascagoula abduction cheerleader? It’s not just the involvement of Dr. J. Allen Hynek (who was impressed), nor the passed polygraphs, nor the secretly recorded conversation between Hickson and Parker in the sheriff’s office, nor the obvious integrity of each man. For me, the whole thing blossomed particularly when the existence of multiple witnesses came up — witnesses on the highway near the Pascagoula River who apparently watched a very strange-looking craft glide into the area where the two men were fishing, at approximately the same time. Among the witnesses, as we’ve noted previously, included three active duty Navy men watching in awe as they proceeded along the highway, and one of them came forward not only to describe what they saw in the sky, but to publicly identify himself and his buddies by name. The AP’s Natalie Chambers wrote about the admirable witness aspect, prompting the late popular ABC Radio commentator Paul Harvey to spend an entire Saturday noon session laying out the Pascagoula mystery for his national audience years after it had occurred, powerfully making the point that Hickson and Parker weren’t exactly alone that fateful late afternoon.

Calvin Parker was reportedly encouraged by his wife to write his own account of the Pascagoula incident — something he really had wanted to do anyway, knowing that the years were passing. Who among us knows how much time we have left on Earth to accomplish things we really feel must be done?

With a foreword by Philip Mantle (who also published the story) and lots of assistance to Parker by well-known UFO researchers to give the book a nudge, Parker’s book should rank among the most important regarding UFO abductions. Yes, the abduction phenomenon can be tricky to explore, and many a case has turned out to be pure nothing, but now and then along comes a story so bizarre, yet so persuasive, that it commands our attention. I’m in Calvin Parker’s corner on this one, have never not been, but I sure as hell never plan to go fishing in Pascagoula.

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